Basque Country

Basque Christmas Character – Olentzero

Berets came to be popularised across Europe and other parts of the world as typical Basque headgear, as reflected in their name in several languages (e.g. béret basque in French; Baskenmütze in German; Basco in Italian; or baskeri in Finnish), while the Basques themselves use the words txapela or boneta. They are very popular and common in the Basque Country. The colours adopted for folk costumes varied by region and purpose: black and blue are worn more frequently than red and white, which are usually used at local festivities. The people of Aragon adopted red berets while the black beret became the common headgear of workers in France and Spain
IChico, Beverly (2005). “Beret”. In Steele, Valerie. Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion. .

A big commemorative black beret is the usual trophy in sport or bertso competitions, including Basque rural sports, the Basque portions of the Tour de France, and the Vuelta Ciclista al Pais Vasco. It may bear sewn ornamental references to the achievement or contest.

France

The black beret was once considered the national cap of France in Anglo-Saxon countries and is part of the stereotypical image of the Onion Johnny. It is no longer as widely worn as it once was, but it remains a strong sign of local identity in the southwest of France. When French people want to picture themselves as “the typical average Frenchman” in France or in a foreign country, they often use this stereotype from Anglo-Saxon countries. There are today, three manufacturers in France. Laulhère (who acquired the formerly oldest manufacturer, Blancq-Olibet, in February 2014)IIindependent.co.uk. Retrieved 27 March 2018. has been making bérets since 1840. Boneteria Auloronesa is a small artisan French beret manufacturer in the Béarnese town of Oloron-Sainte-Marie, and Le Béret Français is another artisan béret maker in the Béarnese village of Laàs. The beret still remains a strong symbol of the unique identity of southwestern France and is worn while celebrating traditional events.IIICover image of Cantabrian craftsman wearing a boina, shared according to CC BY 2.0

Spain

In Spain, depending upon the region, the beret is usually known as the boina. They were once common men’s headwear across the cooler north of the country, in regions of Aragon, Navarre, the Basque Country, Cantabria, Asturias and Galicia and nearby areas.

Scotland

Kilwinning Archer’s Bonnet

There are several Scottish variants of the beret, notably the Scottish bonnet or Bluebonnet; a broad, flat cap of blue wool, formerly worn in Scotland. (originally bonaid in Gaelic), whose ribbon cockade and feathers identify the wearer’s clan and rank. It’s considered a symbol of Scottish patriotism. Other Scottish types include the tam-o’-shanter (named by Robert Burns after a character in one of his poems) and the striped Kilmarnock cap, both of which feature a large pompom in the centre.IVContent shared from Wikipedia – Beret according to CC BY 2.5

Notes:

Notes:
I Chico, Beverly (2005). “Beret”. In Steele, Valerie. Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion.
II independent.co.uk. Retrieved 27 March 2018.
III Cover image of Cantabrian craftsman wearing a boina, shared according to CC BY 2.0
IV Content shared from Wikipedia – Beret according to CC BY 2.5